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Tech Founders Still Don't Believe Diversity Can Boost The Bottom Line
New study suggests tech founders are aware of the benefits that come with a more diverse workforce, but many still fail to foster diversity. The tech industry has historically struggled with diversity and inclusion, and while many founders acknowledge its importance, few have taken proactive steps to reduce bias and improve diversity in the workplace. According to their own diversity reports, 70% of Google's staff are male, as well as 84% of Facebook's tech team, while Twitter's leadership is 72% white and 28% Asian. In a new study conducted by Lawless Research on behalf of Techstars and Chase for Business, 72% of tech founders believe building a diverse workforce is very important, and 81% acknowledge that a diverse workforce enhances creativity and innovation.
Posted on 26 Sep 2016
WomensEntrepreneurshipDay on November the 18th at the United Nations
You are invited to join the third annual of Women's Entrepreneurship Day (WED) celebration on November 18th, 2016 at the United Nations. This monumental event is the world's largest celebration of women innovators and job creators launching startups; bringing ideas to life, driving economic growth, and expanding human welfare. With a variety of days dedicated to various causes, one might ask - Why does the world need a Women's Entrepreneurship Day? Consider then, that women perform 66% of the world's work, yet earn 10% of the world's income. At the same time, they account for 85% of consumer purchases and control $20 trillion in worldwide spending. Women's Entrepreneurship Day (WED) is generating a movement that carries throughout the year in support of women in business globally. WED ignites women leaders, innovators, and entrepreneurs to initiate startups, drive economic expansion, and advance communities worldwide. The flagshipUN event is live-streamed and celebrated in 144 countries and 110 universities and colleges celebrating Women's Entrepreneurship Day internationally reaching over 1.4 million people. The WED mission is to empower the 4 billion women across the globe to be catalysts of change, and uplift the 250 million girls living in poverty globally. In addition to our mission of empowerment, we are committed to gathering a think tank of inspiring women leaders who can amplify our message of expanding businesses with social-good initiatives in communities around the world.
Posted on 26 Sep 2016
How Women Leaders Emerge From Leaderless Groups
In spite of a significant imbalance between male and female leaders in business, new research from the University at Buffalo's School of Management suggests that in collaborative work environments where women are outnumbered, they often emerge as the natural group leader. The findings fly in the face of the reality of the U.S. workforce, where many fail to recognize the extent of the female leadership gap. Women represent just 3% of new CEOs in the U.S., 5.1% of Fortune 1000 CEOs, and 4% of Standard and Poor's 500 CEOs. A recent survey by the Rockefeller Foundation also found that nine in 10 respondents thought there were more female business leaders than there really are, and further research by the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University found that those women are more likely to be targeted by shareholder activism.
Posted on 13 Sep 2016
The Computer Boys Take Over
This is a book about the computer revolution of the mid-twentieth century and the people who made it possible. Unlike most histories of computing, it is not a book about machines, inventors, or entrepreneurs. Instead, it tells the story of the vast but largely anonymous legions of computer specialists--programmers, systems analysts, and other software developers - who transformed the electronic computer from a scientific curiosity into the defining technology of the modern era. As the systems that they built became increasingly powerful and ubiquitous, these specialists became the focus of a series of critiques of the social and organizational impact of electronic computing. To many of their contemporaries, it seemed the ''computer boys'' were taking over, not just in the corporate setting, but also in government, politics, and society in general.
Posted on 13 Sep 2016
Women in Technology International Virtual Career Fair, September 14th, 2016
The WITI Women in Technology International Virtual Career Fair is an online career event where job seekers and employers can interact with each other in a live, 3-D virtual environment. With a global network of smart, talented women and a market reach exceeding 2 million, WITI (Women in Technology International) has established powerful strategic alliances and programs to provide connections, resources and opportunities. Register today to achieve unimagined possibilities and transformations through technology, leadership and economic prosperity.
Posted on 08 Sep 2016
Research and Trends for Women in STEM
Women have increased their numbers in many professions previously dominated by men, including law, business, medicine, and other STEM fields in the U.S; however, the number of women in engineering in the U.S. has not increased since the early 2000s. Each year, significant quantities of scholarly research on women in engineering and STEM are published. The Society of Women Engineers would like this research to be used to understand the causes of the gender disparity in engineering and technology in order to close the gap.
Posted on 08 Sep 2016
Asking for raises benefits men more than women, research finds
It's a myth that men get more raises than women because they ask for them more often, according to research released Tuesday. Using data from 4,600 workers in Australia, the only country that collects information about requested raises, the study (PDF) found that men got raises 20 percent of the time they asked, versus 16 percent for women who work the same number of hours. "No evidence" was found to support the long-held belief that the gender pay gap results from women not being assertive in workplace negotiations, according to the research collected by the Cass Business School in London, the University of Warwick and the University of Wisconsin. In 2015, women working full time earned 79 cents for every dollar earned by men, a gender wage gap of 21 percent, according to the Institute for Women's Policy Research.
Posted on 08 Sep 2016
In Celebration Of Labor Day, A Look At Women In The U.S. Workforce
Women have been breaking all sorts of glass ceilings recently. At the 2016 Rio Olympics, U.S. women took home more gold medals than anybody else. Beyonce was nominated for 11 VMA awards this year and took home eight, setting a record for VMA wins (and the #BeyHive rejoiced). And of course, this summer Hillary Clinton became the first woman to be nominated for president by a major political party. That's never happened in USA nation's 240 year history. And for everyday working women, a lot has changed for the better, too. Wages have increased and some women even now generally earn more than men.
Posted on 08 Sep 2016
Women Bring More Tech Expertise to the Boardroom Than Men Do
According to new Accenture research, female members of corporate boards are nearly twice as likely as their male counterparts to have professional technology experience, which the study defined as either holding a key tech position at a previous employer - such as CTO or CIO - or having senior-level responsibility at a technology firm. Accenture looked at women's representation on the boards of more than 500 Forbes Global 2000 companies in 39 countries across Europe, Asia, the Americas, and Australia. Overall, 16% of the women on these companies boards have digital experience, vs. 9% of men.
Posted on 08 Sep 2016
When tech firms judge on skills alone, women land more job interviews
Diversity in the tech industry has become a major issue, and tech firms from Apple to Facebook to Intel have been releasing annual reports to show how they're doing. The numbers, though, are often lackluster, with little improvement from year to year. For example, Apple's latest diversity report earlier in the month showed the company is 32 percent female, which is 1 percentage point higher than last year. Many companies are trying to pinpoint the cause, yet there are myriad ways women and minority job candidates can get derailed or overlooked. Speak With a Geek seems to have zeroed in on one. Removing traces of gender or race may prevent employers from basing interview decisions on a conscious or unconscious bias, Speak With a Geek said. The former would be an outright belief that women, for instance, aren't as good at coding as men are. The latter would be more subtle and might mean a company picks the man because he better fits that employer's unexamined idea of who a coder is.
Posted on 30 Aug 2016

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