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5 Favorite Networking Principles From A Woman Who Built A Company To Connect Women
Even though 53 percent of employees say a role that allows them to have greater work-life balance and better personal well-being is ''very important'' to them (Gallup's State of the American Workplace 2017), fostering networking built on real-life connections is often forgotten. But networking is so important, and it's often even more important for women, who sometimes lack genuine support in their industries and tend to prioritize roles at home over maintaining female connections. Connections with other women to help one another through real issues, and promote genuine, lasting relationships in business and in life. While some companies are making strides in creating professional female-focused groups, particularly in the technology sector, many times women can forget that remaining connected with women on many different career levels and in different industries can lead to growth and new opportunities.
Posted on 04 Jan 2018
We Need More Women In STEM: The Girl Scouts Want To Help
The gender gap in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics is a known and stubborn quandary: While women make up roughly half of the college-educated U.S. workforce, they account for less than 30% of STEM jobs. To fix that, the Girl Scouts hopes to prepare at least 2.5 million girls for potential STEM-related jobs by 2025. That mission includes a new awareness campaign, followed by the expansion of an elementary-school effort called ''Think Like a Programmer'' to keep girls interested in science and tech as they move on to middle school and high school. The awareness component has a simple message: Women may be underrepresented in science and tech, but they've already made huge impacts. To highlight that, the Girl Scouts created a video in which five of its current members transform into five current and historical STEM icons. They began sharing photos of the transformation in honor of Computer Science Education Week in early December.
Posted on 04 Jan 2018
House OKs 3 Bills to Boost STEM Education & Training
House members approved three bills that would support individuals who aim to pursue careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math, Nextgov reported Friday. The STEM Research and Education Effectiveness and Transparency Act would require the National Science Foundation to inform Congress about its efforts to encourage women and historically underrepresented groups to engage in government research and education programs. The Women in Aerospace Education Act seeks to boost the participation of women in fellowship programs at NASA and national laboratories. The Supporting Veterans in STEM Careers Act would give veterans more opportunities to pursue STEM-related jobs. All three bills were approved as part of Congress' ''Science Day'' and sent to the Senate's commerce, science and transportation committee for review.
Posted on 04 Jan 2018
The newest American Girl doll - an astronaut on a mission to get girls into STEM - hits stores today
Getting more girls into STEM isn't rocket science - you just need to fire up their imaginations. That's the mission behind American Girl's new 2018 Girl of the Year, Luciana Vega, who wants to be the first person on Mars. The Mattel-owned toymaker debuted the aspiring astronaut doll on ''Good Morning America'' last week before a group of girls dressed in official NASA flight suits. American Girl teamed up with an out-of-this-word advisory board, including NASA's former chief scientists Dr. Ellen Stofan and NASA astronaut Dr. Megan McArthur Behnken, to make their first STEM-themed character's story and product line as accurate as possible. Luciana is an 11-year-old who wins a scholarship to attend Space Camp in Huntsville, Alabama. So American Girl editors and product designers visited Space Camp and NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston to see a day in the life of a trainee, such as putting on space suits and learning the ''right'' way to eat in space, or conducting a mission in microgravity.
Posted on 04 Jan 2018
Data doesn't lie: tech firms need to hire more women to succeed
The year 2017 put gender bias in focus again. Firms must study the numbers if they want to thrive, writes entrepreneur and author Sarah Lacy. In this extract from her new book, Lacy makes the case that hiring women isn't just the right thing to do - it makes business sense too.
Posted on 04 Jan 2018
ASCA Webinar Prepare Today's Students for Tomorrow's Careers
Computer science is changing everyone's lives yet few contribute to the technologies and services we all use. Learn about the national Computer Science for All initiative and how school counselors at the vanguard are supporting new courses and viable career pathways so more students get involved in the growing fields of computing. After attending this webinar you should be able to: Define computer science and who's right for it, Identify tips for talking about computer science education and careers with students and parents, teachers and other influencers, Identify factors that influence career decisions and reflect on ideas to support computing careers and Comfortably support viable pathways, whether students' postsecondary plans are for two- or four-year college or military service.
Posted on 26 Dec 2017
FETC 2018 Congress
The 38th National Future of Education Technology Conference is organized between 23 Jan and 26 Jan 2018. The 38th National Future of Education Technology Conference (FETC 2018) will take place at Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida USA. It is going to be a trendsetter Conference, outstanding as one of the most cutting-edge meetings within the Education, Learning, Teaching, Education Technology and Digital Education aspects.
Posted on 26 Dec 2017
Parents in STEM fields boost girls' participation in science degrees
Even when girls perform just as well as boys on standardized math tests, they are half as likely to major in science at college. However, having one parent or guardian work in the STEM (science, technology, engineering or math) field makes it more likely for girls to perform better in math and to enroll in a ''hard sciences'' college degree in programs such as engineering, architecture, math and computer science.
This effect is larger for girls than for boys, according to a study by researchers at the University of Michigan and University of Arkansas. ''An important result is that most of the observed direct positive effects, of having a parent in STEM on the probability of enrolling 'hard science' college degrees, seem to be concentrated among females. This is in line with other work of mine and points to the potential benefit that role modeling could have on women,'' said Gema Zamarro, lead author and an associate professor at Arkansas. ''Our results suggest that there are additional barriers - not only math performance or perceived math ability - that could be stopping women from entering STEM.'' Some of these barriers could be gender stereotypes that break down if a girl has a parent in the STEM field, Zamarro said.
Posted on 26 Dec 2017
The surprising thing Google learned about its employees - and what it means for today's students
The conventional wisdom about 21st century skills holds that students need to master the STEM subjects -science, technology, engineering and math - and learn to code as well because that's where the jobs are. It turns out that is a gross simplification of what students need to know and be able to do, and some proof for that comes from a surprising source: Google. This post explains what Google learned about its employees, and what that means for students across the country. It was written by Cathy N. Davidson, founding director of the Futures Initiative and a professor in the doctoral program in English at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and author of the new book, ''The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World in Flux.'' She also serves on the Mozilla Foundation board of directors, and was appointed by President Barack Obama to the National Council on the Humanities.
Posted on 26 Dec 2017
It's moving slowly, but Pinterest and other tech companies are becoming less white and less male
Slowly but surely, Pinterest is getting more diverse. The company released its annual workforce diversity report on Tuesday, and claims that underrepresented minorities now make up 9 percent of its workforce, up from just 7 percent in 2016. Pinterest is also hiring more female employees: Women account for 45 percent of Pinterest's workforce, up from 44 percent last year, according to this latest report. The data represents advances compared to 2016 government data published earlier this year. And while the changes from year to year may seem small, the company is chipping away at those diversity proportions.
Posted on 26 Dec 2017

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