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''Woke-Washing'' Your Company Won't Cut It
Kelli, a data scientist at a tech company, recently submitted a request for a promotion. Her responsibilities had increased after turnover on her team and she felt the extra work merited recognition. But she was told that the VP who needed to approve the promotion didn't have time to consider it - they were too preoccupied crafting a company response to the renewed conversations about racial injustice and police brutality. As a Black woman asking for her work to be recognized, she was struck by the hypocrisy. ''I found it ironic that senior leadership prioritized their public image when internally they dismissed or ignored the very Black voices that they claimed to care about,'' she told. ''It made the gesture of solidarity feel like a slap in the face.'' As companies all over the U.S. have rushed to advertise their commitment to racial justice and claim common cause with a historic protest movement, we've seen a lot of stories like Kelli's. Her sentiments are representative of the many employees experiencing statement fatigue - a growing level of disinterest, ambivalence, and outright outrage towards companies calling out racial injustice without showing any signs of taking action. And in the current U.S. social climate, employees are becoming more empowered to call out their company's hypocrisy - juxtaposing solidarity statements with lopsided statistics of company representation and personal accounts of negative workplace experiences.
Posted on 29 Jul 2020
Online R Challenge – Advance UNM
Are you looking for a new challenge? Want to level up your data analysis and visualization skills? Learn R using this tutorial series by Advance at UNM, a member of AWIS' ARC Network. Using the R programming language can be a great tool in a variety of disciplines for data analysis and visualization. To help you get started, the Advance at UNM have compiled several video tutorials, a list of resources and a space to chat about what you're doing in R.
Posted on 12 May 2020
Scientist Mothers Face Extra Challenges in the Face of COVID-19
When COVID-19 began to spread globally and stay-at-home orders were issued broadly, many were quick to point out that Sir Isaac Newton was his most productive when forced to stay home during London's Great Plague of 1665. This commentary was almost immediately followed by the observation obvious to any scientist mother: Isaac Newton didn't have caregiving responsibilities. The pandemic is bringing to light many challenges that people have long worked to address. We are members of 500 Women Scientists, working to build a more inclusive scientific community and highlighting the unique challenges faced by women in scientific disciplines. It is clear to us that workplace policies and culture can undermine women's success in STEM fields. The ''mom penalty,'' for example, is all too familiar to many of us. Now, the global COVID-19 pandemic and the social distancing necessary to address it have compounded our concerns about women’s success in scientific disciplines, worsening nearly every disadvantage that women already face.
Posted on 12 May 2020
Celebrating women in science
Sunday, 11 February, was the International Day of Women and Girls in Science. To mark the day, the female scientists from around the world have been asked to reflect on their experiences and offer their advice. The responses have been edited for clarity and brevity.
Posted on 11 Mar 2020
19 Things You Might Not Know Were Invented by Women
Necessity isn't the only mother of invention. Though it wasn't always easy to get patents or the credit they deserved, women are responsible for many items we use today. America got a brand new paper bag when cotton mill worker Margaret Knight invented a machine to make them with a flat square bottom in 1868. (Paper bags originally looked more like envelopes.) A man named Charles Annan saw her design and tried to patent the idea first. Knight filed a lawsuit and won the patent fair and square in 1871.
Posted on 08 Feb 2020
The heroines STEM: Ten women in science you should know
Science is often considered a male-dominated field. In fact, according to United Nations data, less than 30% of scientific researchers worldwide are women. Studies have shown that women are discouraged from, or become less interested in, entering the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) beginning at a young age. And according to the Pew Research Center, women remain underrepresented in engineering, computer science and physical science. But despite challenges of gender discrimination and lack of recognition in the scientific community, countless inspiring women in these fields have made historic contributions to science and helped advance understanding of the world around us. Many were not recognized in their own lifetimes, but their achievements have helped generations of female scientists to come. We all learned about Marie Curie and Jane Goodall, but here are 10 more women in science you should know.
Posted on 08 Feb 2020
Meet The Amazing Women Of Chemistry
Read the collection of interviews, profiles, and career snapshots of women in the molecular sciences C&EN has compiled.
Posted on 06 Jan 2020
100 Brilliant Women in AI Ethics to Follow in 2019 and beyond
Meet the women working relentlessly to save humanity from the dark side of AI. We live in very challenging times. The pervasiveness of bias in AI algorithms and autonomous ''killer'' robots looming on the horizon, all of which necessitate an open discussion and immediate action to address the perils of unchecked AI. The decisions we make today will determine the fate of future generations.
Posted on 16 Dec 2019
Meet the Mighty Women of NASA's New Astronaut Class
When NASA announced its newest class of astronaut candidates, it included five inspiring women! NASA received a record-breaking number of applicants for this astronaut class - over 18,000 in all - and the class itself has twelve members, their largest since the year 2000. ''These women and men deserve our enthusiastic congratulations,'' said retired astronaut and Johnson Space Center Director Ellen Ochoa. ''Children all across the United States right now dream of being in their shoes someday. We here at NASA are excited to welcome them to the team and look forward to working with them to inspire the next generation of explorers.'' The astronaut candidates have two years of training in front of them before they're ready to break Eart's atmosphere, but in the meantime, space-loving Mighty Girls have five new role models to look up to! In this blog post, we introduce you to these five remarkably talented women. And, to inspire children who dream of their own careers in space, at the end of the post, we've showcased a variety of girl-empowering books and toys about shooting for the stars!
Posted on 01 Dec 2019
Black Woman Who Helped Create The Gps Finally Gets Some Recognition
Inspired by the re-telling of her sorority sister's engineering success in the now classic film ''Hidden Figures'', a Virginia woman named Gladys West is coming forward with her hidden history and involvement in created a technology most of us use everyday - GPS. As it turns out, like her sorority sister, West is also an important forgotten figure of technological advancement in the U.S. before and during the Civil Rights movement. This time, its West's work on the modern day GPS system during her 42-year career at the Navy base in Dahlgren where her work was essential to her team which developed the Global Positioning System in the 1950s and 1960s.
Posted on 27 Nov 2019

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