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The Dangers Of Keeping Women Out Of Tech
Computer science is one of the few STEM fields in which the number of women has been dropping. But as the president of Harvey Mudd College, Maria Klawe has been able to boost the proportion of women in its CS program to an impressive 40 percent.
Posted on 29 Jan 2018
The most common excuses for not having enough women leaders are myths
From the Golden Globes to this week's World Economic Forum in Davos, the topic on every group of leaders' agenda is ''women.'' Thanks to movements like -MeToo and -TimesUp, and given the prospect of a record number of women running for office, women's voices are being heard like never before. But if we want what's been dubbed ''The Year of the Woman'' to be more than a slogan, we also need significant numbers of women heading our biggest companies and institutions, the organizations that can drive real change. And that won't happen unless we recognize that the world still operates under a set of assumptions- we prefer to call them myths -that hold women back from reaching anything near parity in the upper ranks. These myths go something like this: If only women would be more assertive. If only they would raise their hands and take more risks. If we could just fix the women, then the leadership roles that have so long eluded women would be theirs.
Posted on 29 Jan 2018
Microsoft president says there would be fewer reports of sexual harassment if more women were in leadership positions
Microsoft President Brad Smith says there were would fewer reports of sexual harassment if there were more females in leadership positions. Diversity is a major issue in tech industry, says Smith, also chief legal officer. Microsoft is taking ''concrete steps'' to address diversity issues, he argues.
Posted on 11 Jan 2018
Expansion of AP computer science courses draws more girls and minorities
Ten years ago, girls were so scarce in high school computer science classes that the number of female students taking Advanced Placement tests in that subject could be counted on one hand in nine states. In five others, there were none. Latino and African American students were also in short supply, a problem that has bedeviled educators for years and hindered efforts to diversify the high-tech workforce. Now, an expansion of AP computer science classes is helping to draw more girls and underrepresented minorities into a field of growing importance for schools, universities and the economy. Testing totals for female, black and Latino students all doubled in 2017, following the national debut of an AP course in computer science principles. It joined a longer-established AP course focused on the programming language Java. Racial and gender imbalances persist. But education leaders said the data show a significant advance in a quest to banish the stereotype that computer science is mainly for coding geeks who tend to be white or Asian American boys.
Posted on 11 Jan 2018
Karlie Kloss on Coding, Women in Tech, and Breaking the Glass Ceiling
Coding is the language of the future. It's the first step to launching that innovative app or program that will change the world, but as Karlie Kloss discovered, not enough women speak it. In an effort to create a level playing field, she launched Kode With Klossy, an organization that arms women with the tools they need to enter the tech world. What started as a free summer coding camp became a powerful network uniting women in tech. Now it awards career scholarships to young female developers and touts itself as a national community. Kode With Klossy's success proves what we've known all along: When women support each other, incredible things can happen. In a candid conversation with Kode With Klossy camper Torie Pfau, 18, Karlie shares her thoughts on coding, succeeding in a male-dominated field, and why it's important to get into your panic zone.
Posted on 26 Dec 2017
How Melinda Gates used computer science to help solve this major issue in tech
While philanthropist Melinda Gates spends much of her time working with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation on ways to resolve and prevent global health crises, she has also brought attention to the lack of women and minorities in the industry where she started her professional career: technology. As a Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing keynote speaker in October, Gates used her computer programming expertise to reveal the problem with how women are currently led onto a career path in tech and the simple solution to improve inclusion. Gates emphasized how women are bound to an impractical amount of constraints that don't allow them to successfully enter the tech world.
Posted on 12 Dec 2017
Create culture of inclusion if you want true workplace diversity
All employers and employees must take responsibility for creating a safe and inclusive environment, instead of placing the task of calling out culturally destructive behavior on the shoulders of minorities.
Posted on 30 Nov 2017
Some Latinos believe science may negatively impact their kids' faith
More than one-third of Latinos interviewed in a recent study believe science education may have a negative impact on the religious faith of their children, according to new research from sociologists at Rice University.
The study examined the relationship between STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education and religious faith from the perspective of blacks and Latinos, two groups that are among the most religious in the U.S. Study authors Daniel Bolger, a Rice Ph.D. student, and Elaine Howard Ecklund, founding director of the Religion and Public Life Program and the Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Social Sciences, conducted the study to investigate what impact parents think science education will have on their children's faith.
Posted on 20 Nov 2017
The Tech Industry's Gender-Discrimination Problem
The dramatic imbalance in pay and power has created the conditions for abuse. More and more, women are pushing for change.
Posted on 20 Nov 2017
Need to address the dropout rate of women in tech: Paula Stern
Paula Stern, Chairwoman of The Stern Group, a public policy advisory company, has never seen such dynamic shifts as a result of technology in her over three decades of work. The former Chairwoman of US International Trade Commission spoke to BusinessLine at the 'Unlocking US-India trade potential' conference on the need for a greater push of upskilling, the continued biases women face in technology and whether the efforts taken by outsourcing companies in the US are bearing fruits.
Posted on 20 Nov 2017

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