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Computer Science - Children's Reading List
A link to the list of books promoting computer science for elementary, middle and high school children.
Posted on 01 Dec 2015
Why Women are Uniquely Equipped to Drive Successful Tech Companies
The roles of a woman at home and as a team member in tech companies are remarkably similar. In both scenarios, it's crucial to take on a diverse variety of responsibilities. It's not uncommon for women to switch from role to role in daily life - and have no problem doing it. This ability is essential for tech companies who need team members to handle an influx of responsibilities at once and effortlessly glide from one role to the next. As the buzz around getting more women in tech is skyrocketing, I wonder: Are we doing it simply to level out the playing field in a competitive, booming industry? While gender equality is essential in the workplace, bringing more women into the tech industry shouldn't just be about fairness or equality. It comes down to merit. Women are uniquely equipped to thrive in and drive tech companies. Because of our experiences and gifts, women can take tech to a whole new level.
Posted on 13 Nov 2015
CODEGIRL documentary shows high school girls that they too can use tech to change their communities
The documentary that follows the 2015 Technovation Challenge, in which girls from all over the world code mobile apps to address problems in their communities.
Posted on 13 Nov 2015
Women preferred for STEM professorships - as long as they're equal to or better than male candidates
Since the 1980s, there has been robust real-world evidence of a preference for hiring women for entry-level professorships in science, engineering, technology and math (STEM). This evidence comes from hiring audits at universities. For instance, in one audit of 89 US research universities in the 1990s, women were far less likely to apply for professorships - only 11% - 26% of applicants were women. But once they applied, women were more likely to be invited to interview and offered the job than men were.
Posted on 22 Oct 2015
How LinkedIn embeds diversity goals into day-to-day management
You can often tell much about how seriously a company regards a new strategy or initiative by whether or not someone's compensation is tied to its success. Erica Lockheimer, Linked's director of engineering growth and women in tech, somewhat casually mentioned that 20% of time - and therefore a portion of her salary and bonus - is tied to the social media company's overall diversity goals.
Posted on 22 Oct 2015
Men and Women Biased About Studies of STEM Gender Bias - In Opposite Directions
In 2012, an experiment on gender bias shook the scientific community by showing that science faculty favor male college graduates over equally qualified women applying for lab manager positions. Though the study was rigorous, many didn't believe it. 'This report is JUNK science. There is no data here,' said one online commenter. Others justified the bias saying, 'In every competitive situation, with a few exceptions, the women I worked with were NOT competent.' Now, a study published in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) provides crucial clues about why some people were critical of the original finding - and other studies that have followed. The new study's authors reasoned that men especially might devalue the evidence because it threatens the legitimacy of their status in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. Men might also be critical because of prior beliefs that gender bias is not a problem in STEM.
Posted on 22 Oct 2015
More Companies Say Targets Are the Key to Diversity
Some businesses believe that voicing support isn't enough. They also have to set discrete goals. When bonus time rolls around at Johnson & Johnson, top managers are evaluated on revenue, profits and other metrics. This year, their payout will be partly determined by a new set of numbers: diversity metrics, including how many women they hired in the past year. Realizing that simply voicing support for diversity initiatives won't lead to meaningful change, big companies are setting discrete goals for hiring and retaining women. These include mandating that diverse candidates are interviewed for jobs, and ensuring that new hires get interviewed or vetted by someone other than white men.
Posted on 04 Oct 2015
What's Holding Women Back in the Workplace?
Despite support at the top, gender equality is a long way off at most U.S. companies. A study by Lean In and McKinsey reveals why - and what employees and companies can do about it. A new LeanIn.Org and McKinsey & Co. study on Women in the Workplace finds that corporate diversity initiatives aren't helping women break the glass ceiling. WSJ's Shelby Holliday takes a closer look at the reasons why and other key takeaways from the data.
Posted on 04 Oct 2015
Tech Companies Try to Make More Room for Women
Slack Technologies is one of several companies pushing to change the industry's mind-set - When Anne Toth, an early employee at Yahoo Inc. in the late 1990s, asked what the company's parental-leave policy was, human resources didn't know, Ms. Toth says. No one had ever come back to work at the startup after having a baby, she was told.
Posted on 04 Oct 2015
What I Do: A Year of Diversity Work at Pandora
A reflection on a year of diversity work and the story behind diversity numbers at Pandora.
By Lisa Lee (Senior Diversity Manager, Pandora)
Posted on 04 Oct 2015

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