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The most common excuses for not having enough women leaders are myths
From the Golden Globes to this week's World Economic Forum in Davos, the topic on every group of leaders' agenda is ''women.'' Thanks to movements like -MeToo and -TimesUp, and given the prospect of a record number of women running for office, women's voices are being heard like never before. But if we want what's been dubbed ''The Year of the Woman'' to be more than a slogan, we also need significant numbers of women heading our biggest companies and institutions, the organizations that can drive real change. And that won't happen unless we recognize that the world still operates under a set of assumptions- we prefer to call them myths -that hold women back from reaching anything near parity in the upper ranks. These myths go something like this: If only women would be more assertive. If only they would raise their hands and take more risks. If we could just fix the women, then the leadership roles that have so long eluded women would be theirs.
Posted on 29 Jan 2018
Microsoft president says there would be fewer reports of sexual harassment if more women were in leadership positions
Microsoft President Brad Smith says there were would fewer reports of sexual harassment if there were more females in leadership positions. Diversity is a major issue in tech industry, says Smith, also chief legal officer. Microsoft is taking ''concrete steps'' to address diversity issues, he argues.
Posted on 11 Jan 2018
Expansion of AP computer science courses draws more girls and minorities
Ten years ago, girls were so scarce in high school computer science classes that the number of female students taking Advanced Placement tests in that subject could be counted on one hand in nine states. In five others, there were none. Latino and African American students were also in short supply, a problem that has bedeviled educators for years and hindered efforts to diversify the high-tech workforce. Now, an expansion of AP computer science classes is helping to draw more girls and underrepresented minorities into a field of growing importance for schools, universities and the economy. Testing totals for female, black and Latino students all doubled in 2017, following the national debut of an AP course in computer science principles. It joined a longer-established AP course focused on the programming language Java. Racial and gender imbalances persist. But education leaders said the data show a significant advance in a quest to banish the stereotype that computer science is mainly for coding geeks who tend to be white or Asian American boys.
Posted on 11 Jan 2018

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