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Infosys Foundation USA to Host Free Computer Science Training for over 800 Public School Teachers in Summer 2018
Inspired by the success of past funding initiatives to train thousands of public school teachers, Infosys Foundation USA will host the Pathfinders Summer Institute 2018, a national convening for K-12 teacher education in Computer Science and Making. InfyPathfinders will be an intensive week of professional development to be held at Indiana University Bloomington (IUB) from July 15-20, 2018. Over 800 teachers from across the United States will convene on the IUB campus for high-quality, hands-on training for K-12 grade level Computer Science (CS) and Maker education. Interested teachers and school administrators can find out more and register their interest at: infy.com/Pathfinders
Posted on 12 Dec 2017
An Assembly Line of Coding Students? Tough Questions for the Computer Science Movement
What does it really mean to prepare students for a future in coding careers? Clive Thompson, a freelance writer for Wired and The New York Times magazine, thinks the reality is not as rosy as many people think. In a popular Wired article titled, The Next Big Blue-Collar Job is Coding, Thompson criticizes pop culture and some writers, like himself, for overly romanticizing the notion of the 'lone genius coder'- the Mark Zuckerbergs and Mr. Robots of the world- saying that's not what every coder looks like and that's not what many coders will be. Thompson recently talked with EdSurge about the future of programming work in the United States and the realities students will face in their future job searches. The conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity. Listen to a complete version of the interviews below, or on your favorite podcast app (like iTunes or Stitcher).
Posted on 12 Dec 2017
8 States, 76 School Districts, And 102 Organizations Worldwide Pledge To Expand Computer Science Education For Millions Of Students
At an event hosted by Code.org to kick off Computer Science Education Week, 8 states, 76 school districts, and 102 organizations worldwide made new pledges to expand access to computer science for millions of students, focusing on diversity. The news was announced and celebrated by some of the most powerful women in technology, including Melinda Gates, Peggy Johnson of Microsoft, Sheryl Sandberg, and Susan Wojcicki, as well as Governors Steve Bullock of Montana, Asa Hutchinson of Arkansas, Eric Holcombof Indiana, and Lt. Governor Gavin Newsom of California. Code.org also announced a new milestone of 10 million girls with student accounts on its learning platform and $12 million in new philanthropic funding from donors including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Infosys Foundation USA, and PricewaterhouseCoopers.
Posted on 12 Dec 2017
Can Robots Help Get More Girls Into Science And Tech?
Here's a depressing number for you: 12. Just 12 percent of engineers in the United States are women. In computing it's a bit better, where women make up 26 percent of the workforce-but that number has actually fallen from 35 percent in 1990. The United States has a serious problem with getting women into STEM jobs and keeping them there. Silicon Valley and other employers bear the most responsibility for that: Discrimination, both overt and subtle, works to keep women out of the workforce. But this society of ours also perpetuates gender stereotypes, which parents pass on to their kids. Like the one that says boys enjoy building things more than girls. There's no single solution to such a daunting problem, but here's an unlikely one: robots. Not robots enforcing diversity in the workplace, not robots doing all the work and obviating the concept of gender entirely, but robots getting more girls interested in STEM. Specifically, robot kits for kids-simple yet powerful toys for teaching youngsters how to engineer and code.
Posted on 30 Nov 2017
Discover how the 2016-18 Pacesetters cohort is setting the pace for change with disruptive, innovative approaches
NCWIT Pacesetters is a unique, fast-track program in which committed corporate, startup, and university leaders work across boundaries to accelerate their organizations' number of technical women.
Posted on 30 Nov 2017
Calling all women postdocs in STEM
The L'Oreal USA For Women in Science fellowship program awards five women postdoctoral scientists annually with grants of $60,000 each for their contributions in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields and commitment to serving as role models for younger generations. The program is the U.S. component of the L'Oreal-UNESCO For Women in Science International Fellowships program. Celebrating its fourteenth year in the U.S., the For Women in Science program has awarded 70 postdoctoral women scientists over $3.5 million in grants. L'Oreal USA partners with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to manage the program's application and peer-review process. Each year, the program attracts talented applicants from diverse STEM fields, representing some of the nation's leading academic institutions and laboratories.The 2018 L'Oreal USA for Women in Science application period will open December 4th, 2017 and will close on February 2nd, 2018.
Posted on 30 Nov 2017
2018 Act-W National, April 11th -13th, 2018 in Phoenix, AZ
The main focus is to truly create a sense of community and offer engagement for all experience levels, diversity groups, and tech professionals, combining the benefits of our regional ACT-W Conferences to open it up to our thousands of ChickTech members! All proceeds from the first annual ACT-W National Conference go towards providing STEM education programs to local high school girls and expanding the global ChickTech network to truly impact the reach of women in tech!
Posted on 30 Nov 2017
CS4RI Summit 2017, 13th December 2017, Rhode Island University
The CS4RI Summit aims to inspire the next generation of computer scientists, entrepreneurs, and engaged tech sector employees... and anyone who wants to build the skills of the future. Together, let's excite students with the many educational and career opportunities that result from studying CS. We're challenging the entire Rhode Island community, from kindergarteners to CEOs, to showcase and celebrate computer science in action!
Posted on 30 Nov 2017
The biggest buzzword in Silicon Valley doesn't make any sense
Algorithms have an inordinate amount of influence on our lives. The predominant ones largely dictate the friends we interact with online, the goods we buy, and the news we see. An algorithm (YouTube's) even made Justin Bieber happen-and that's probably the least impressive example. In a society as tech-obsessed as ours, this prevalence means that algorithms have obtained an almost magical quality. They represent the deus ex machina of the science-fiction thriller that is real life, a plot device that makes our tools do the things they do. According to anthropologist Nick Seaver of Tufts University, algorithms have so thoroughly graduated into the realm of cultural abstraction that they should be studied anthropologically. Seaver studies technology's effects on contemporary culture - he's written a whole book about the codes that select music for us - and says algorithms' outsize role in culture means that we have to understand what they are and how we think about them from a cultural perspective. In the latest issue of Big Data and Society (pdf), Seaver argues that even the word ''algorithm'' has moved beyond computer-science definitions and no longer refers to computer code compiled to perform a task. It belongs to all and is fair game for social scientists, like himself, to define in complex terms.
Posted on 30 Nov 2017
21 Weird Tech Job Titles Of The Future
While many human workers fear that they will ultimately be replaced by artificial intelligence (AI), it's more likely that our current workforce will shift into new types of roles for people, according to a new report from professional services company Cognizant. ''In the future, work will change but won't go away,'' the report stated. ''Work will continue to be core to our identities, our nature, our dreams and our realities. But it won't necessarily be the work we know or do now.''
Posted on 30 Nov 2017

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